Two Oceans is a lie…and 3 other marathon myths busted!

It’s not really the Two Oceans…and other myths to remember while running South Africa’s favourite ultra-marathon, the Two Oceans Marathon, in Cape Town.

The Two Oceans Marathon has been described as “the world’s most beautiful ultra-marathon”, and that much is certainly true. The 56-kilometre endurance race winds its way around the dramatic Cape Peninsula, taking in the waters of False Bay before crossing over to Noordhoek on the Atlantic coast. Then it’s a breathtaking jaunt along Chapman’s Peak before the gruelling climb up Constantia Nek and the sweet relief of the downhill towards the finish at University of Cape Town.

But the name of the race itself is a white lie. The marathon derives its name from the popular myth that the Cape Peninsula is where the Atlantic and Indian Ocean meet. Some Capetonians will even go so far as to cheekily tell you that you can see a line where these two oceans butt up against one another at Cape Point. In fact these two bodies of water only meet 200 kilometres east at Cape Agulhas (sans the line in the sea), but it still makes for a good story. Here are three more ultra-marathon myths you should be aware of before race day.

1. You need to run all the way

Many would-be marathon runners (yes, you) get put off by the idea that you have to run all the way. That’s not true. In fact, unless you’re amongst the top groups it’s unlikely you’re going to be able to run the entire distance. Old hands will tell you that stretches of brisk walking actually help break up the more daunting sections of the run and you can use these walking breaks to make the distance more manageable. Just be sure to make the cut-off times at the demarcated points – 28km halfway on Noordhoek Main Road by 10h00 and 42,2km at Hout Bay Main Road by 11h50.

2. Drink as much as you can

The long-held belief that you need to drink as much as you can, even if you don’t feel thirsty, has been heavily challenged in recent years. Instead, there’s a growing trend in ultra-marathon circles to “drink when you are thirsty”. Over-hydration may in fact decrease performance and even be dangerous, according to Professor Tim Noakes in his book Waterlogged. Instead try a balanced approach, taking into account the heat and humidity of course.

3. You can’t have enough electrolytes

In fact, you can. Electrolytes are essential for balancing fluids in the cells and keeping you hydrated and your muscle function in check. But research has shown that your body can only store and process so much of these vital minerals. After that, your body will either just push them out (think pee and sweat). Or even worse, too many electrolytes can cause cramping, diarrhoea and vomiting. So remember to go easy on the sports drinks.